Join Your Law School’s Sports and Entertainment Law Society or Found It Yourself

One of the coolest and more beneficial things I have stumbled upon since being in law school is the idea of a Sports Law/Sports and Entertainment Law Society.

For anyone that is in the same boat as me—i.e. looking to have a career in sports as an attorney—the Sports and Entertainment Law Society at your respective law school (or undergrad if applicable) is a good start as far as putting yourself out there and trying to discover more about the field.

Through this organization, networking opportunities that would not otherwise be available become available. You’re able to meet experts in the field that can provide advice and interesting stories on their experiences in their work as an attorney in the sports industry. On top of that, you are getting the opportunity to work with likeminded people that are in the same position as you and who also love sports.

Many law schools have these types of organizations so it is as simple as going to an introductory meeting and joining through signing up and possibly paying dues. Once you sign up, continue building up the program and carrying on what is hopefully an already successful and worthwhile organization.

For those of you who do not have a Sports Law/Sports & Entertainment Law Society, this presents an even BIGGER opportunity. If it’s not there, nothing should stop you from forming it yourself—if you are passionate about it. This presents—not only a great resume booster—a great opportunity to build something special and fun for not only yourself, but others in the law school who may not have thought of the idea of a sports law society. It also provides a path for those that come along after you have left that will undoubtedly be interested in the sports law industry. Whatever the case, joining will allow for opportunities that lead to careers, contacts, or more.

As for my experience, I had the chance to be a co-founder of the Sports & Entertainment Law Society at the University of Memphis Law School.

A few months ago, one of my friends at law school approached me and a few others with the idea of founding/re-starting the Sports & Entertainment Law Society at our law school because he knew that he and I have similar aspirations. I immediately was interested and could already see the benefits of starting something as great as a society that combines the law with sports—especially with friends in my law school class that shared the same interests.

Before I knew it, we had been granted allowance to re-start the society and we drafted our constitution for approval (it was approved). After that, we advertised the society and tried to get as many people to join as possible. Much to our astonishment, there was a great amount of interest among the law school student body, which was a pleasant surprise because we knew we now had an opportunity to build something worthwhile.

So far, we have had a very successful beginning to the Sports & Entertainment Law Society. Not only have we attracted many other law students to want to join, but we have put together programs with speakers who have taken their law degree and have had an accomplished career in the sports world.

Since we are in Memphis, we have tried to utilize all local connections in an effort to build a strong home base and connections within the city. Guests have included Zach Kleiman (General Counsel for the Memphis Grizzlies), Lionel Hollins (former head coach of the Memphis Grizzlies), and Greg Gaston (former founder of the Sports & Entertainment Law Society at Memphis Law/Manager of Business Development for the Memphis Tigers Sports Properties with Learfield Sports). All have provided valuable insight into the sports law world and into different professions post-law school. We already have several more guest speakers scheduled and know that the society will only grow bigger and better in the years to come.

This was not accomplished without some help, however. We also had the opportunity to reach out to friends at different law schools that had already established Sports Law Societies and they provided valuable insight into starting it up (many of the friends we asked came from our connections at the Oregon Law School Summer Sports Law Institute).

With that said, I highly encourage all readers—if interested—to join your law school’s Sports Law Society or start your own. It is well worth the time and can only help you grow in your potential. If you are looking to start your own, I also welcome any questions on how we went about starting ours up at Memphis Law. My contact information is in the “Contact” tab and I am glad to answer any and all questions.

As always, thank you for reading and God Bless!

You don’t have to be great to start, but you have to start to be great.” — Zig Ziglar

—Dale Hutcherson

 

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